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Real Estate RVA Biz & Gov

“We put to CAR a design that was like a mullet”

Jason Tesauro’s next installment following getting a new house built at the end of Broad Street is now up at Richmond Magazine:

From the outset, we knew that our front facade and roofline would be the big issues since our rear facade is shielded from public view and thus out of the commission’s jurisdiction. CAR wants new construction to blend in, but it doesn’t want faux old designs that mimic historic homes. Likewise, it doesn’t want non sequiturs that undermine integrity and visual flow (see entry under “McMansion among row houses.”) With our architects, we put to CAR a design that was like a mullet: All business in the front and a party in the back. But, like the mullet, it failed. CAR sent us back to the drawing board to address issues with the roofline, front porch, basement and windows.

PREVIOUSLY:

  1. Follow along as Amy and Jason Tesauro build a 15-wide dream house on Broad Street

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Lori Jefferson Skeeter
Lori Jefferson Skeeter
4 years ago

Lori Jefferson Skeeter liked this on Facebook.

Joe Cook for Richmond City Council District 7
Joe Cook for Richmond City Council District 7
4 years ago
Lisa Moore
Lisa Moore
4 years ago

Lisa Moore liked this on Facebook.

Joseph Carson
Joseph Carson
4 years ago

Joseph Carson liked this on Facebook.

Eric S. Huffstutler
Eric S. Huffstutler
4 years ago

At first glance, the new design above fits in a lot better than the previous design. But there are some design elements too modern or not “Victorian” enough. Keep in mind with windows, if you use one with divisions, the Muntins have to be real and not strips inside the glass. The porch needs to be more substantial and probably have columns to complement the neighboring ones and not simply look like a shed lean-to. The roofline can’t be a fake crown front – not sure about the height but if you can resolve the rooftop, the height isn’t a… Read more »

David Hoffman
David Hoffman
4 years ago

Are the rules really this stifling? I would like to own something and not be told what to do, except in extreme cases where I am ruining everything for everyone else.

Eric S. Huffstutler
Eric S. Huffstutler
4 years ago

David, yes… the Old & Historic guidelines set by the National Parks for historic property and neighborhoods, are strict about keeping the feel and look of protected neighborhoods. New structures as well as rebuilds and additions have to be run by the CAR (Commission of Architectural Review) first for approval. Has been that way for years with The Virginia Department of Historic Resources restrictions to register historic property and whole neighborhoods.

David Hoffman
David Hoffman
4 years ago

As long as it doesn’t lead to houses falling apart and people not being able to afford to live in them. I assume it allows all sorts of changes for a disabled person such as a ramp or a lift?

Eric S. Huffstutler
Eric S. Huffstutler
4 years ago

Accommodations are different as well as interior and the rear of a house not within eyeshot of the street. This owner is attempting to build on an empty lot that is much narrower than usual so deign options are limited. I think they have the main house look down but have to tweak a few things.

Eric S. Huffstutler
Eric S. Huffstutler
4 years ago

Just to be clear, the DHR is a different registry – state and national, while O&H is local and protected by the National Parks rules and the local CAR. Sometimes the map boundaries match but not always. Two different groups to appease.

Kevin Svensen
Kevin Svensen
4 years ago

Kevin Svensen liked this on Facebook.

Elaine Odell
Elaine Odell
4 years ago

Friends and neighbors, go straight to the source/regulating body for your information. Learn about Richmond Old and Historic Districts at http://www.richmondgov.com/commissionarchitecturalreview/ There is a link to maps that will tell you if your home/building is in a Richmond Old and Historic District. You can download the PDF Old & Historic Districts Handbook and Design Review Guidelines from that webpage, too. The most tangible benefit of National & State Historic District designation is the availability of Rehabilitation Tax Credits for qualifying existing structures. To learn about that, go to: Go to http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/tax_credits/tax_credit_faq.htm Get the facts. Nothin but the facts.

Lee
Lee
4 years ago

Just a follow up on the previous post(s): State and National Historic Districts are not the same thing as city old and historic districts. State tax credit: 25% Of rehab costs. Federal tax credit: 20% Usually, with the state and federal credit, the registers are both state and federal so the property is eligible for both. Someone else will have to chime in if it’s possible to only be eligible for one, and not the other, but if that’s the case it appears to be uncommon for that to happen. in any event the state and federal Historic Districts are… Read more »

tom okelly
tom okelly
4 years ago

I’ve done many a tax credit applications, with the state tax credits you can collect and sell the property the next day, you can move in and live there, you can rent it out. Now the federal tax credits are different, they are geared towards the investor , for commercial work, with federal credits you MUST rent out the property for a minimum of five (5) years. If your transferring (selling ) them to an investor then comes the LLC documents

Michael Hild
Michael Hild
4 years ago

Michael Hild liked this on Facebook.

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