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Civic Engagement Community Real Estate

Eviction and Poverty

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Lee
Lee
1 year ago

I think this has been discussed (inconclusively?) in the comments for previous articles, but: do we have any idea what these researchers are considering to be an “eviction.” This could be a) the initial five-day pay or quit notice b) the filing of an unlawful detainer suit c) when a tenant loses an unlawful detainer suit or d) when the sheriff’s office executes a writ of possession. A, B, and C are all preliminary steps and don’t always result in a tenant being forced to leave. If these researchers are counting notice to pay or quit, then they are overlooking… Read more »

SA Chaplin
SA Chaplin
1 year ago

Free enterprise is generally what responds to any market “crisis.” (Remember the gas crisis?) Population is growing, as it inevitably does. More people are choosing to live in cities than in the recent past. But the laws of supply and demand will resolve any “crisis” which people perceive (or which may actually exist). My only fear is that government steps in to try and fix things. This always makes matters worse, but we never seem to learn this. Unfortunately, the VCU team is planning to produce a report outlining the scope of the problem as well as “different policy and… Read more »

bill
bill
1 year ago

eviction is often a result of not paying rent, and no money is a sign of poverty. good to see the academics are putting that together.

Leslie Moore
Leslie Moore
1 year ago

I am glad to see VCU getting involved in this. Matthew Desmond’s book Evicted (Pulitzer and a New York Times “Best Book” award 2016) is a powerful read on this. I personally know a family that was evicted while the person on the lease was hospitalized from a stroke. Housing instability is a major, multi-layered problem in our city.

Johnathan
Johnathan
1 year ago

I think I am missing something. I don’t the premise in any of this. What is this housing crises you speak of? I don’t see a crises in affordable housing. What I see is people not having the discipline to get an education, advance their skill set, and balance their income/expenses to afford the housing that they want verses the housing they can afford. Not everyone can afford their own place and need to stop living as if they can, then filling it all up with rented furniture pretending as if they are some big shot. As far as the… Read more »

ilya y
ilya y
1 year ago

#2 It’s nice that you are so certain that government ALWAYS makes matters worse. I’m sure you’ve arrived at this conclusion after studying the matter.

I don’t think you realize that government is involved no matter what. You just don’t acknowledge it when it works in your favor. You can’t sell a house without the government being involved (title).

Grace
Grace
1 year ago

#1 data collection methods for the original eviction lab can be found on the evictionlab.org and I’m sure VCU is going to operate in a similar fashion. FAQ: https://evictionlab.org/methods/#methods-report Full Methodology Report: https://evictionlab.org/docs/Eviction%20Lab%20Methodology%20Report.pdf #3 it’s far more complicated than that and our rank as #2 should be concerning. I have no doubt the research will have some inaccuracies but if you read the articles you can see it has enough significance to warrant a closer look. We need to be asking questions for why it would seem like we have more evictions than Detroit. Perhaps how our records are processed… Read more »

SA Chaplin
SA Chaplin
1 year ago

@ilya – A couple of examples of wayward government involvement —just in the area of “affordable” housing: -rent control -subsidized housing/housing projects -zoning restrictions (e.g., San Francisco) -red tape involving building permits -unreasonably restricting landlord’s ability to evict -the 2007-08 financial crisis (brought to us courtesy of Federal Reserve loose money policies together with Congress’s Community Reinvestment Act —passed to aid everyone in owning their own home). And, by the way, title to my home is not courtesy of the government, nor is a recording office really necessary (even though it is helpful). Without such a government office, private persons… Read more »

L
L
1 year ago

@ Grace/7 – thank you for the link. I read through the methodology section, and it appears that they are counting any award of possession to the Landlord as an eviction. In Virginia, it is my understanding that doesn’t automatically result in an eviction – a Landlord may subsequently negotiate with an evicted Tenant. I think the distinction is that in other states this is usually a court mediated process, whereas here it is entirely outside of the court system. I have no idea how common this sort of negotiation is. As a Landlord I have made post eviction rental… Read more »

SA Chaplin
SA Chaplin
1 year ago

@Grace: You might want to read up on social mobility. “Most working Americans who were initially in the bottom 20 percent of income-earners, rise out of that bottom 20 percent. More of them end up in the top 20 percent than remain in the bottom 20 percent.

https://patriotpost.us/opinion/17067-economic-mobility

This from Thomas Sowell, a Harvard educated (magna cum laude) economist who has a doctorate from University of Chicago. (Mr. Sowell uses IRS statistics in reaching his conclusions, btw.)

Grace
Grace
1 year ago

@SA Chaplin Pew Research: https://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/assets/2015/07/fsm-irs-report_artfinal.pdf?la=en “These IGEs suggest that children raised in families that are far apart on the income distribution can expect very different economic futures when they become adults. As shown in Figure 2, children raised in low-income families will probably have very low incomes as adults, while children raised in high-income families can anticipate very high incomes as adults. The differences are extreme: The expected income of children raised in well-off families (90th percentile) is about 200 percent larger than the expected income of children raised in poor families (10th percentile) and about 75 percent larger than… Read more »

Grace
Grace
1 year ago

Pew Research also used IRS statistics in reaching their conclusion

bill
bill
1 year ago

if poverty is not a desired condition, are you saying poor people should not have children?

Grace
Grace
1 year ago

@Bill Im not saying that all. I’m saying local governments need to make better efforts to help people not live in poverty and make sure children have at the minimum basic financial security. The strategies they currently have inplace are insufficient.

Bill
Bill
1 year ago

What is in place promotes poverty

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