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East End News

Revisiting the 10 most blighted houses in Church Hill

Back in March 2010, we selected 10 houses as The 10 most blighted houses in Church Hill. These decaying houses scattered across the area were the worst among what at times seemed like a sea of vacant houses.

Almost 5 years later, 3 of the houses have been restored, 5 have been demolished, and 2 still sit waiting for whatever comes next.

It is worth noting that two best renovations were undertaken by non-profit organizations: the stunning renovation at 2012 Fairmount Avenue was by Better Housing Coalition, and 909 North 24th Street was wonderfully renovated by Southside Community Development & Housing Corporation.

What struck me in rolling around for the updated photos is that, while there continue to be areas plagued by vacancy, this level of ragged decrepitness is almost non-existent. Also, the metamorphosis of Church Hill North along the S Street corridor is almost unbelievable.

Click any image below to view larger.

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1200 North 20th Street (2014/2010)
1200 North 20th Street (2014/2010)

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2012 Fairmount Avenue (2014/2010)
2012 Fairmount Avenue (2014/2010)

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611 North 30th Street (2014 /2010)
611 North 30th Street (2014 /2010)

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909 North 24th Street (2014/2010)
909 North 24th Street (2014/2010)

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1312-1314 Oakwood Avenue (2014/2010)
1312-1314 Oakwood Avenue (2014/2010)

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1410 North 25th Street (2014/2010)
1410 North 25th Street (2014/2010)

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1608 North 22nd Street (2014/2010)
1608 North 22nd Street (2014/2010)

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2117-2119 Cedar Street (2014/2010)
2117-2119 Cedar Street (2014/2010)

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2508 Q Street (2014/2010)
2508 Q Street (2014/2010)

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2902 East Leigh Street (2014/2010)
2902 East Leigh Street (2014/2010)

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32 comments

CH Resident 12/08/2014 at 9:13 AM

We sometimes forget how far we have come over these last few years – thanks John for this posting.
Yes, more work to be done, to be sure, but at the same time let us appreciate positive, cooperative, community work done together to improve all of CH.

Reply
Matt Conrad 12/08/2014 at 9:16 AM

@BHC_RVA I can’t post enough appreciation to your organization for what you have done in the East End. In the decade I’ve lived up here, your committment and transformative work is unmatched. Bring on Venable!

On a related note, the Cedar Street property has languished for four years and is one of the most extraordinary houses in Union Hill:

The Patrick Lynch House was built as a single dwelling around 1860, according to the Union Hill historic district nomination completed by Kim Chen. “This 2-story, 4-bay home is constructed from over-sized beige sand bricks. The brick is laid in 4-course American bond on sides with 5-course of Flemish bond between parapets. The brick is laid in stretcher bond on the front facade. The foundation on the west side has brownstone and granite slabs.”

Reply
dana 12/08/2014 at 10:12 AM

I looked into 2117-2119 Cedar. The price was ridiculously prohibitive for today’s market values. The repoint, alone, would cost more than buying two shells.

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Matt Conrad 12/08/2014 at 1:53 PM

I just learned that the Patrick Lynch house on Cedar Street was purchased for renovation by an entity called Cedar Preservation LLC. A quick search shows it is registered to Travis Gardner of the Gardner Companies. Here’s to a happier new year for that amazing house!

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ann 12/08/2014 at 3:18 PM

As a quick follow-up to Matt’s information on the Cedar Street property, the previous owner was emptying the house in August because of the pending sale and at least one new downspout has been installed to move water away from the front of the house. Splendid place!

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Drew Billups 12/08/2014 at 8:00 PM

Matt, I looked into the Cedar Street property when it was for sale by owner. The owner was asking 90K for the building and had demoed the staircase leading from the first to the second floor on one side and the second to the third on the other. Also, he had gotten rid of an entire chimney to make a plumbing/mechanical chase. I’m really interested to see if it’s built into a single family home or a duplex and how they go about it.

Reply
C White 12/09/2014 at 10:09 AM

It’s a picky thing but before and after pictures should be formatted as the before picture first, then the after . Yours appear the other way around and it makes it slightly confusing. But kudos otherwise for showcasing how much the City is making changes to be better.

Reply
Big dreams for a big house - Church Hill People's News | Richmond, Virginia 03/24/2017 at 10:17 PM

[…] directly across the street was named CHPN’s most blighted house in Church Hill in 2010 ( and demolished within a few years). The house across the other way burned 11 years ago and the lot still sits empty. Then there was […]

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