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Demolition on 20th Street

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JessOfRVA
JessOfRVA
6 years ago

Such a shame! That was once a very pretty house, I bet!

Julie Oliver
Julie Oliver
6 years ago

Julie Oliver liked this on Facebook.

ann
ann
6 years ago

That’s a real loss. A unique old house!

laura
laura
6 years ago

Too bad…it really doesn’t look like it’s in bad shape so that it couldn’t be rehabbed fairly easily.

Kathleen Sanders
Kathleen Sanders
6 years ago

That’s a really cute cottage.

Cadeho
Cadeho
6 years ago

Again, the city and owners of historic houses do not care about the holes created when these houses are demolished. They also don’t care about the stories they help tell about the neighborhoods or architectural significance. This house will most likely never be rebuilt. How many other houses like it does the city have? Probably very few. I can only hope someone builds a replica and not a cheap, ugly rip-off.

Lee
Lee
6 years ago

Can the city tax vacant property at a higher rate? Can the rate climb exponentially the longer it sits vacant? Can the city then sell it all at tax auction (Most of these absentee landlords won’t pay)?
Alternately, how about a Baltimore style 1$ house program (requiring renovation plans and financing, of course)

Or are both/all of these ideas totally unrealistic/unfeasible?

BAF
BAF
6 years ago

@5 While the house was cute and interesting, the only story it was helping tell was one of decay, blight and neglect. Not every home can be saved, especially if no one steps up with the money to do the saving. Given some of the homes the city has condemned to demolition that they have not gotten around to months after the fact, that this one was actually knocked down is likely a testament to the reality that it was both dangerous and unlikely to be rehabilitated. The “hole” that was created is better than a dangerous collapse that injures… Read more »

Lee
Lee
6 years ago

@7 While your points are fair – especially your comment that it is unrealistic to expect these homes to last forever, I think you’re overlooking the fact that there are numerous qualities to these buildings that are unique, especially in that if the buildings are not saved, those qualities are not easily replicable. While the aesthetics (and sometimes the craftsmanship) of period homes greatly exceeds what is currently feasible, there are bigger issues at stake. Due to a combination of labor costs, loss of traditional building arts, standardization, increased materials costs, market inefficiencies, zoning, banking rules, land use and development… Read more »

BAF
BAF
6 years ago

@8 I would agree that better code enforcement by the city might avoid the level of deterioration to reach this level. Your comment on the need for housing like this is all well and fine. But in this case either no one was interested in selling or there was no buyer. Perhaps, like the case of a vacant home on my block, the owners are long dead and there is no one to maintain the property. Even if the city could gain title to the house, if it cannot sell it as is, what recourse does it have to pay… Read more »

chpnfan
chpnfan
6 years ago

Perhaps it’s time for “Houses of Old Richmond Part II”; A photo essay of these unique and in danger houses that will sadly, most likely meet a bull dozer. A shame to lose them and the record of the City’s unique working force houses of the past.

crd
crd
6 years ago

@6 Lee – at least a decade ago, someone named Richard Day proposed the Baltimore style homesteading to city council, and was turned down flat. I don’t know where to find him now, last I heard he was living somewhere off Semmes Ave. I think he was a realtor at some point, but am not even sure of that. You might try to find him and see if he thinks it would pass now. It’s a great idea, and did wonders for B’more. Your comment was the first I’d even thought about it in many years, but it’s worth a… Read more »

crd
crd
6 years ago

@6, now that I think of it, maybe he was a mortgage banker back in those days, not a realtor. Anyway, he seriously proposed homesteading and got turned down. At some point, I cheered on folks on this site trying to get a dog park in Chimborazo Park, and hey , it happened. Someone needs to start something like homesteading….

John Vetrovec
John Vetrovec
6 years ago

@11 CRD- I know Richard Day and have his contact info as I play squash with him. He’s not a realtor but a construction to perm loan officer. If you want to catch up to him, hit me up tiglathpilesar@gmail.com.

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